Students share stories of determination and success at graduation - February 23, 2011

Record Number: 7213
Displayed from: Feb 23, 2011 , until: Mar 31, 2011

A working mother who only knew one word of English hamburger when she came to the U.S., a refugee from the Congo, a man who returned to school after forty years and a young father who found he couldn't pursue his dreams without his education will share their stories of determination and success during the Continuing Education Commencement Event at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 2, at North Side High School. The four speakers are among the nearly 250 graduates who completed the continuing education program at Anthis Career Center or satellite sites between January and December 2010. Students will receive a GED or high school diploma during the ceremony at North Side. The Literacy Alliance will host a reception prior to the ceremony from 6:15-6:45 p.m. The Adult and Continuing Education program at Anthis Career Center serves adult students of all ages, many of whom have endured educational and personal struggles on their road to graduation. Among those speaking at the ceremony are: Ed Burgo left school as a teenager after attempting 10th grade three times. At the time, he knew he could leave school and get a job, but after being laid off a year ago, he found it was no longer so easy to get a job without a high school diploma. He went back to school to earn his GED and now is in a management training program. Rocio De Lira is a working mother of three. She started at Anthis Career Center by taking English language classes before moving on to GED classes. Going to school while working was a challenge, but it paid off. She now inspects the products her company manufactures. Adam Logsdon admits he didn't push himself very hard when he was in high school. After working in bars and restaurants to make ends meet, he decided he needed to do something more with his life. After earning his GED, he plans to attend Ivy Tech or IPFW with the hope of opening his own music studio some day. Maguy Mikobi came to Fort Wayne as a refugee from the Congo. She began taking English language classes at Anthis and advanced into the GED classes. After a couple of years, she was ready to take the test. Now, she plans to attend IPFW. While she is undecided about her career path, she is considering studying business.

With nearly 30,000 students, Fort Wayne Community Schools is one of the largest school districts in Indiana. FWCS proudly allows families to choose any of its 50 schools through its successful school-choice program creating diversity in each school, including some with more than 75 languages spoken. FWCS offers seven magnet schools focusing on areas such as science and math, communication, fine arts or Montessori at the elementary and middle school level. In high school, students can choose from the prestigious International Baccalaureate program, Project Lead the Way or New Tech Academy as well as other rigorous academic and specialty training programs.